Factors affecting center of pressure in older adults: the Framingham Foot Study Public Deposited

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Creator
  • Hagedorn, Thomas J
    • Other Affiliation: Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA, USA
  • Hannan, Marian T
    • Other Affiliation: Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
  • Riskowski, Jody L
    • Other Affiliation: Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, Scotland
  • Hillstrom, Howard J
    • Other Affiliation: Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA
  • Dufour, Alyssa B
    • Other Affiliation: Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
  • Casey, Virginia A
    • Other Affiliation: Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA, USA
  • Golightly, Yvonne
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Thurston Arthritis Research Center, Injury Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine
Abstract
  • Abstract Background Although aberrant foot movement during gait has been associated with adverse outcomes in the lower extremities in clinical patients, few studies have analyzed population differences in foot function. The purpose of this study was to assess demographic differences in foot function in a large population-based study of community-dwelling adults. Methods Participants in this study were from the Framingham Foot Study. Walking data were collected from both feet using a Tekscan Matscan pressure mat. Foot function was characterized using the center of pressure excursion index (CPEI). T-tests were used to assess differences between population subsets based on sex, and in men and women separately, age, body mass index (BMI), physical activity and in women, past high heel use. Results There were 2111 participants included in this analysis. Significant differences in CPEI were noted by sex (p< 0.0001), by age in women (p = 0.04), and by past high heel use in women (p = 0.04). Conclusions Foot function during gait was affected by sex, as well as by age and shoe-wear in women, but not by BMI or physical activity. Future work will evaluate possible relations between CPEI and outcomes such as falls, sarcopenia, and lower extremity function.
Date of publication
Identifier
  • 23657058
  • doi:10.1186/1757-1146-6-18
Resource type
  • Article
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Rights holder
  • Thomas J Hagedorn et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
License
Journal title
  • Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
Journal volume
  • 6
Journal issue
  • 1
Page start
  • 18
Language
  • English
Is the article or chapter peer-reviewed?
  • Yes
ISSN
  • 1757-1146
Bibliographic citation
  • Journal of Foot and Ankle Research. 2013 May 08;6(1):18
Access
  • Open Access
Publisher
  • BioMed Central Ltd
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