Peer support opportunities across the cancer care continuum: a systematic scoping review of recent peer-reviewed literature Public Deposited

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Creator
  • Kowitt, S.D.
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine
  • Ellis, K.R.
    • Other Affiliation: University of Michigan
  • Carlisle, V.
    • Affiliation: N.C. Cancer Hospital, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Bhushan, N.L.
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health
  • Black, K.Z.
    • Other Affiliation: East Carolina University
  • Brodar, K.
    • Other Affiliation: University of Miami
  • Cranley, N.M.
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Health Behavior
  • Davis, K.L.
    • Other Affiliation: Washington University School of Medicine
  • Eng, E.
    • Affiliation: N.C. Cancer Hospital, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Martin, M.Y.
    • Other Affiliation: University of Tennessee Health Science Center
  • McGuirt, J.
    • Other Affiliation: University of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • Sokol, R.L.
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Health Behavior
  • Tang, P.Y.
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health
  • Vines, A.I.
    • Affiliation: N.C. Cancer Hospital, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Walker, J.S.
    • Affiliation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Health Sciences Library
  • Fisher, E.B.
    • Affiliation: N.C. Cancer Hospital, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
Abstract
  • Objective: Evidence suggests peer support (PS) is as an effective strategy for enhancing prevention and control of chronic and infectious diseases, including cancer. This systematic scoping review examines the range and variety of interventions on the use of PS across the cancer care continuum. Method: We used a broad definition of PS to capture a wide-range of interventions and characterize the current status of the field. Literature searches were conducted using PubMed, SCOPUS, and CINAHL to identify relevant articles published from January 2011 to June 2016. We screened the title and abstracts of 2087 articles, followed by full-text screening of 420 articles, resulting in a final sample of 242 articles of which the most recent 100 articles were reviewed (published June 2014 to May 2016). Results: A number of the recent intervention studies focused on breast cancer (32%, breast cancer only) or multiple cancer sites (23%). Although the interventions spanned all phases of the cancer care continuum, only 2% targeted end-of-life care. Seventy-six percent focused on clinical outcomes (e.g., screening, treatment adherence) and 72% on reducing health disparities. Interventions were primarily phone-based (44%) or delivered in a clinic setting (44%). Only a few studies (22%) described the impact of providing PS on peer supporters. Conclusion: PS appears to be a widely used approach to address needs across the cancer care continuum, with many opportunities to expand its reach.
Date of publication
Keyword
DOI
Resource type
  • Article
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Journal title
  • Supportive Care in Cancer
Journal volume
  • 27
Journal issue
  • 1
Page start
  • 97
Page end
  • 108
Language
  • English
ISSN
  • 0941-4355
Publisher
  • Springer Verlag
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