Anticoagulant SERPINs: Endogenous Regulators of Hemostasis and Thrombosis Public Deposited

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Creator
  • Grover, Steven P.
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology
  • Mackman, Nigel
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology
Abstract
  • Appropriate activation of coagulation requires a balance between procoagulant and anticoagulant proteins in blood. Loss in this balance leads to hemorrhage and thrombosis. A number of endogenous anticoagulant proteins, such as antithrombin and heparin cofactor II, are members of the serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) family. These SERPIN anticoagulants function by forming irreversible inhibitory complexes with target coagulation proteases. Mutations in SERPIN family members, such as antithrombin, can cause hereditary thrombophilias. In addition, low plasma levels of SERPINs have been associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. Here, we review the biological activities of the different anticoagulant SERPINs. We further consider the clinical consequences of SERPIN deficiencies and insights gained from preclinical disease models. Finally, we discuss the potential utility of engineered SERPINs as novel therapies for the treatment of thrombotic pathologies.
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  • Article
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  • In Copyright
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  • Attribution 4.0 International
Journal title
  • Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
Journal volume
  • 9
Language
  • English
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  • 2297-055X
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