Association between genomic recurrence risk and well-being among breast cancer patients Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Creator
  • Aaronson, Neil K
    • Other Affiliation: Division of Psychosocial Research and Epidemiology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam, CX, 1066, The Netherlands
  • van Harten, Wim H
    • Other Affiliation: Division of Psychosocial Research and Epidemiology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam, CX, 1066, The Netherlands; Governance and Management, MB-HTSR, University of TwenteSchool, PO Box 217, Enschede, AE, 7500, The Netherlands
  • Rutgers, Emiel JT
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Surgical Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam, CX, 1066, The Netherlands
  • Brewer, Noel T.
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, N.C. Cancer Hospital, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine
  • Retèl, Valesca P
    • Other Affiliation: Division of Psychosocial Research and Epidemiology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam, CX, 1066, The Netherlands
  • Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina GM
    • Other Affiliation: Governance and Management, MB-HTSR, University of TwenteSchool, PO Box 217, Enschede, AE, 7500, The Netherlands
Abstract
  • Abstract: Background: Gene expression profiling (GEP) is increasingly used in the rapidly evolving field of personalized medicine. We sought to evaluate the association between GEP-assessed of breast cancer recurrence risk and patients’ well-being. Methods: Participants were Dutch women from 10 hospitals being treated for early stage breast cancer who were enrolled in the MINDACT trial (Microarray In Node-negative and 1 to 3 positive lymph node Disease may Avoid ChemoTherapy). As part of the trial, they received a disease recurrence risk estimate based on a 70-gene signature and on standard clinical criteria as scored via a modified version of Adjuvant! Online. \\Women completed a questionnaire 6–8 weeks after surgery and after their decision regarding adjuvant chemotherapy. The questionnaire assessed perceived understanding, knowledge, risk perception, satisfaction, distress, cancer worry and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), 6–8 weeks after surgery and decision regarding adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Women (n = 347, response rate 62%) reported high satisfaction with and a good understanding of the GEP information they received. Women with low risk estimates from both the standard and genomic tests reported the lowest distress levels. Distress was higher predominately among patients who had received high genomic risk estimates, who did not receive genomic risk estimates, or who received conflicting estimates based on genomic and clinical criteria. Cancer worry was highest for patients with higher risk perceptions and lower satisfaction. Patients with concordant high-risk profiles and those for whom such profiles were not available reported lower quality of life. Conclusion: Patients were generally satisfied with the information they received about recurrence risk based on genomic testing. Some types of genomic test results were associated with greater distress levels, but not with cancer worry or HRQoL. Trial registration: ISRCTN: ISRCTN18543567
Date of publication
Identifier
  • doi:10.1186/1471-2407-13-295
  • 23777535
Resource type
  • Article
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Rights holder
  • Valesca P Retèl et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
License
Journal title
  • BMC Cancer
Journal volume
  • 13
Journal issue
  • 1
Page start
  • 295
Language
  • English
Is the article or chapter peer-reviewed?
  • Yes
ISSN
  • 1471-2407
Bibliographic citation
  • BMC Cancer. 2013 Jun 18;13(1):295
Access
  • Open Access
Publisher
  • BioMed Central Ltd
Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items