Why do some coronaviruses become pandemic threats when others do not? Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Creator
  • Rice, Benjamin L.
    • Other Affiliation: Princeton University
  • Lessler, Justin
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Epidemiology
  • McKee, Clifton
    • Other Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
  • Metcalf, C. Jessica E.
    • Other Affiliation: Princeton University
Abstract
  • Despite multiple spillover events and short chains of transmission on at least 4 continents, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has never triggered a pandemic. By contrast, its relative, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has, despite apparently little, if any, previous circulation in humans. Resolving the unsolved mystery of the failure of MERS-CoV to trigger a pandemic could help inform how we understand the pandemic potential of pathogens, and probing it underscores a need for a more holistic understanding of the ways in which viral genetic changes scale up to population-level transmission.
Date of publication
Keyword
DOI
Identifier
Resource type
  • Article
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
License
  • Attribution 4.0 International
Journal title
  • PLOS Biology
Journal volume
  • 20
Journal issue
  • 5
Language
  • English
Version
  • Publisher
ISSN
  • 1545-7885
Parents:

This work has no parents.

In Collection:

Items