MSM HIV testing following an online testing intervention in China Public Deposited

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Creator
  • Han, Larry
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Biostatistics
    • Other Affiliation: University of North Carolina Project-China, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; Guangdong Provincial Centres for Skin Diseases and STI Control, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
  • Pan, Stephen W
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Institute for Global Health and Infectious Disease
  • Wong, Ngai S
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Institute for Global Health and Infectious Disease
    • Other Affiliation: University of North Carolina Project-China, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; Stanley Ho Centre for Emerging Infectious Diseases, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
  • Tang, Weiming
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Institute for Global Health and Infectious Disease
    • Other Affiliation: University of North Carolina Project-China, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; SESH Global, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
  • Tucker, Joseph
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Institute for Global Health and Infectious Disease
    • Other Affiliation: University of North Carolina Project-China, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; SESH Global, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; Guangdong Provincial Centres for Skin Diseases and STI Control, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
Abstract
  • Abstract Background Scaling up HIV testing is the first step in the HIV treatment continuum which is important for controlling the HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM). Following an online HIV testing intervention among MSM, we aim to examine sociodemographic and spatial factors associated with HIV testing. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis on data from an online HIV testing intervention among MSM who had never-tested for HIV. The survey was distributed through online networks connected to all provinces and regions of China. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to examine factors associated with testing three weeks post-intervention. Results At three weeks after the intervention, 36% of 624 followed-up MSM underwent HIV testing, 69 men reported positive HIV test results. Having money for sex, ever tested for sexually transmitted infections and intimate partner violence experience were significant factors of post-intervention HIV testing. Students were less likely to undergo HIV testing at follow-up compared to others (adjusted odds ratio=0.69, 95% C.I.=0.47–0.99), adjusted by age and type of intervention. Moderate provincial spatial variation of testing was observed. Conclusions While high risk men generally had higher HIV testing rates, some MSM like students had lower testing rates, suggesting the need for further ways to enhance HIV testing in specific MSM communities.
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  • Article
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  • In Copyright
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  • The Author(s).
Language
  • English
Bibliographic citation
  • BMC Infectious Diseases. 2017 Jun 19;17(1):437
Publisher
  • BioMed Central
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