Analysis of nuclear fiber cell compaction in transparent and cataractous diabetic human lenses by scanning electron microscopy Public Deposited

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Creator
  • Costello, Joeseph
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
  • Kuszak, Jer R
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; Department of Pathology, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA
  • Freel, Christopher D
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
  • Al-Ghoul, Kristin J
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Anatomy, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; Department of Ophthalmology, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA
Abstract
  • Abstract: Background: Compaction of human ocular lens fiber cells as a function of both aging and cataractogenesis has been demonstrated previously using scanning electron microscopy. The purpose of this investigation is to quantify morphological differences in the inner nuclear regions of cataractous and non-cataractous human lenses from individuals with diabetes. The hypothesis is that, even in the presence of the osmotic stress caused by diabetes, compaction rather than swelling occurs in the nucleus of diabetic lenses. Methods: Transparent and nuclear cataractous lenses from diabetic patients were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Measurements of the fetal nuclear (FN) elliptical angles (anterior and posterior), embryonic nuclear (EN) anterior-posterior (A-P) axial thickness, and the number of EN fiber cell membrane folds over 20 μm were compared. Results: Diabetic lenses with nuclear cataract exhibited smaller FN elliptical angles, smaller EN axial thicknesses, and larger numbers of EN compaction folds than their non-cataractous diabetic counterparts. Conclusion: As in non-diabetic lenses, the inner nuclei of cataractous lenses from diabetics were significantly more compacted than those of non-cataractous diabetics. Little difference between diabetic and non-diabetic compaction levels was found, suggesting that diabetes does not affect the degree of compaction. However, consistent with previous proposals, diabetes does appear to accelerate the formation of cataracts that are similar to age-related nuclear cataracts in nondiabetics. We conclude that as scattering increases in the diabetic lens with cataract formation, fiber cell compaction is significant.
Date of publication
Identifier
  • doi:10.1186/1471-2415-3-1
  • 12515578
Resource type
  • Article
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Rights holder
  • Christopher D Freel et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Journal title
  • BMC Ophthalmology
Journal volume
  • 3
Journal issue
  • 1
Page start
  • 1
Language
  • English
Is the article or chapter peer-reviewed?
  • Yes
ISSN
  • 1471-2415
Bibliographic citation
  • BMC Ophthalmology. 2003 Jan 06;3(1):1
Access
  • Open Access
Publisher
  • BioMed Central Ltd
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