Development and Validation of an Eating-Related Eco-Concern Questionnaire Public Deposited

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Creator
  • Qi, Baiyu
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Epidemiology
  • Presseller, Emily K.
    • Other Affiliation: Drexel University
  • Cooper, Gabrielle E.
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
  • Kapadia, Avantika
    • Other Affiliation: National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences
  • Dumain, Alexis S.
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
  • Jayawickreme, Shantal M.
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
  • Bulik-Sullivan, Emily C.
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
  • van Furth, Eric F.
    • Other Affiliation: Leiden University Medical Center
  • Thornton, Laura M.
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
  • Bulik, Cynthia M.
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
  • Munn-Chernoff, Melissa A.
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
Abstract
  • Eco-concern, the distress experienced relating to climate change, is associated with mental health, yet no study has examined disordered eating related to eco-concern. This study developed and validated a 10-item scale assessing Eating-Related Eco-Concern (EREC). Participants (n = 224) completed the EREC, Climate Change Worry Scale (CCWS), and Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Construct validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency were evaluated. Sex differences in EREC were evaluated using t-tests. Associations among the EREC, CCWS, and EDE-Q were evaluated using linear regression models. Sensitivity analyses were conducted in individuals below EDE-Q global score clinical cut-offs. Factor analysis suggested that all items loaded adequately onto one factor. Pearson’s correlation and Bland–Altman analyses suggested strong correlation and acceptable agreement between the EREC and CCWS (r = 0.57), but weak correlation and low agreement with the EDE-Q global score (r = 0.14). The EREC had acceptable internal consistency (α = 0.88). No sex difference was observed in the EREC in the full sample; females had a significantly higher mean score than males in sensitivity analysis. The EREC was significantly positively associated with the CCWS and EDE-Q global and shape concern scores, but not in sensitivity analysis. The EREC is a brief, validated scale that can be useful to screen for eating-related eco-concern.
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  • Article
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  • In Copyright
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  • Attribution 4.0 International
Journal title
  • Nutrients
Journal volume
  • 14
Journal issue
  • 21
Language
  • English
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  • Publisher
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  • 2072-6643
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