Parity-related molecular signatures and breast cancer subtypes by estrogen receptor status Public Deposited

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Creator
  • Rotunno, Melissa
    • Other Affiliation: National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA; Genetic Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 9609 Medical Center Drive, RM 6E508, MSC 9769, Bethesda MD 20892-9769, USA
  • Sun, Xuezheng
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Epidemiology
  • Figueroa, Jonine
    • Other Affiliation: National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
  • Sherman, Mark E
    • Other Affiliation: National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
  • Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    • Other Affiliation: Institute for Cancer Research, London SW7 3RP, UK
  • Meltzer, Paul
    • Other Affiliation: National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
  • Williams, Tyisha
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Biology, Trinity University, San Antonio TX 78212, USA
  • Schneider, Sallie
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Veterinary and Animal Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst MA 01003, USA
  • Jerry, D
    • Other Affiliation: Pioneer Valley Life Sciences Institute, Springfield MA 01199, USA
  • Yang, Xiaohong R
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Epidemiology
  • Troester, Melissa A
    • Other Affiliation: National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
Abstract
  • Abstract Introduction Relationships of parity with breast cancer risk are complex. Parity is associated with decreased risk of postmenopausal hormone receptor–positive breast tumors, but may increase risk for basal-like breast cancers and early-onset tumors. Characterizing parity-related gene expression patterns in normal breast and breast tumor tissues may improve understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying this complex pattern of risk. Methods We developed a parity signature by analyzing microRNA microarray data from 130 reduction mammoplasty (RM) patients (54 nulliparous and 76 parous). This parity signature, together with published parity signatures, was evaluated in gene expression data from 150 paired tumors and adjacent benign breast tissues from the Polish Breast Cancer Study, both overall and by tumor estrogen receptor (ER) status. Results We identified 251 genes significantly upregulated by parity status in RM patients (parous versus nulliparous; false discovery rate = 0.008), including genes in immune, inflammation and wound response pathways. This parity signature was significantly enriched in normal and tumor tissues of parous breast cancer patients, specifically in ER-positive tumors. Conclusions Our data corroborate epidemiologic data, suggesting that the etiology and pathogenesis of breast cancers vary by ER status, which may have implications for developing prevention strategies for these tumors.
Date of publication
DOI
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Resource type
  • Article
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Rights holder
  • Melissa Rotunno et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
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Journal title
  • Breast Cancer Research
Journal volume
  • 16
Journal issue
  • 1
Page start
  • R74
Language
  • English
Is the article or chapter peer-reviewed?
  • Yes
ISSN
  • 1465-5411
Bibliographic citation
  • Breast Cancer Research. 2014 Jul 08;16(4):R74
Access
  • Open Access
Publisher
  • BioMed Central Ltd
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