Breast cancer brain metastases: evidence for neuronal-like adaptation in a ‘breast-to-brain’ transition? Public Deposited

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Creator
  • Siegel, Marni B
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Genetics, N.C. Cancer Hospital, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Anders, Carey
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, N.C. Cancer Hospital, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Medicine
  • Van Swearingen, Amanda E
    • Affiliation: N.C. Cancer Hospital, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine
Abstract
  • Abstract Brain metastases remain a significant challenge in the treatment of breast cancer patients due to the unique environment posed by the central nervous system. A better understanding of the biology of breast cancer cells that have metastasized to the brain is required to develop improved therapies. A recent Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences article demonstrates that breast cancer cells in the brain microenvironment express γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-related genes, enabling them to utilize GABA as an oncometabolite, thus gaining a proliferative advantage. In this viewpoint, we highlight these findings and their potential impact on the treatment of breast cancer brain metastases.
Date of publication
Identifier
  • doi:10.1186/bcr3651
Resource type
  • Article
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Rights holder
  • Van Swearingen et al.; license BioMed Central Ltd.
Language
  • English
Bibliographic citation
  • Breast Cancer Research. 2014 May 06;16(3):304
Publisher
  • BioMed Central
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