The Undergraduate Survey Course as an Introduction to Planning Public Deposited

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Creator
  • Hibbard, Michael
    • Other Affiliation: Professor and Department Head, Department of Planning, Public Policy, and Management, University of Oregon
  • Hankins, Wes
    • Other Affiliation: Professor, Urban and Regional Planning Program, School of Industrial Technology, East Carolina University
Abstract
  • There has been a rising interest in undergraduate planning education in recent years. A basic indicator of this trend is the growing number of undergraduate programs. Successive editions of the Guide to Undergraduate Education in Urban and Regional Planning document this. The second edition of the Guide (Hankins et al. 1988) lists thirty-four programs that award undergraduate degrees in planning and an additional eighteen non-degree programs. Three years later, the third edition (Hankins et al. 1991) lists thirty-seven undergraduate degree-granting planning programs, fourteen "planning-related" undergraduate degree-granting programs, and twenty-two non-degree programs. Probably a more engaging indicator for most academics is the recent flowering of dialogue on the nature, purpose, and feasibility of undergraduate planning education The Report of the Commission on Undergraduate Education of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP) (Niebanck et al., 1990), also called the Niebanck Report, has stimulated much discussion at ACSP's annual meetings, and there have been several recent pieces in the Journal of Planning Education and Research (Goldsmith 1991. Hotchkiss 1992. Goldsmith 1992, Niebanck 1992, Dalton and Hankins 1993). One part of the dialogue revolves around how undergraduate planning education is to be conceptualized. The issue can be roughly stated in the following two questions: 1) Is professional planning education possible and appropriate at the undergraduate level? 2) Are there goals for undergraduate planning education other than preparation for professional practice?
Date of publication
DOI
Resource type
  • Article
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Journal title
  • Carolina Planning Journal
Journal volume
  • 21
Journal issue
  • 1
Page start
  • 34
Page end
  • 37
Language
  • English
Digital collection
  • Carolina Planning Journal
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