Cohort profile: seek, test, treat and retain United States criminal justice cohort Public Deposited

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Creator
  • Young, Jeremy D
    • Other Affiliation: Infectious Disease Fellowship Program, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA
  • Golin, Carol E.
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Health Behavior
  • Gordon, Michael S
    • Other Affiliation: Friends Research Institute, Baltimore, USA
  • Strand, Lauren N
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
  • Rich, Josiah D
    • Other Affiliation: Medicine and Epidemiology, Brown University, Center for Prisoner Health and Human Rights, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, USA
  • Taxman, Faye
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Criminology, Law and Society, George Mason University, Fairfax, USA
  • Wohl, David
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine
  • Kuo, Irene
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The George Washington University, Washington, USA
  • Kruszka, Bridget
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
  • Nance, Robin M
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
  • Young, Rebekah
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
  • Biggs, Mary L
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
  • Chris Delaney, J.A.
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
  • Cunningham, William
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Health Policy and Management, Medicine, General Internal Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA
  • Lorvick, Jennifer
    • Other Affiliation: Urban Health Program, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, USA
  • Springer, Sandra A
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, USA
  • Spaulding, Anne
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Emory University, Atlanta, USA
  • Altice, Frederick L
    • Other Affiliation: Medicine and Epidemiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, USA
  • Knight, Kevin
    • Other Affiliation: Institute of Behavior Research, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, USA
  • Ouellet, Lawrence J
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA
  • Chandler, Redonna
    • Other Affiliation: Division of Clinical Innovation, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Washington, USA
  • Beckwith, Curt G
    • Other Affiliation: Division of Infectious Diseases, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, USA
  • Crane, Heidi M
    • Other Affiliation: School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
  • Sacks, Stanley
    • Other Affiliation: Center for the Integration of Research and Practice (CIRP), National Development and Research Institutes, Inc. (NDRI), New York, USA
  • Seal, David
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, USA
  • Flynn, Patrick M
    • Other Affiliation: Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, USA
  • Kral, Alex H
    • Other Affiliation: Urban Health Program, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, USA
Abstract
  • Abstract Background The STTR treatment cascade provides a framework for research aimed at improving the delivery of services, care and outcomes of PLWH. The development of effective approaches to increase HIV diagnoses and engage PLWH in subsequent steps of the treatment cascade could lead to earlier and sustained ART treatment resulting in viral suppression. There is an unmet need for research applying the treatment cascade to improve outcomes for those with criminal justice involvement. Methods The Seek, Test, Treat, and Retain (STTR) criminal justice (CJ) cohort combines data from 11 studies across the HIV treatment cascade that focused on persons involved in the criminal justice system, often but not exclusively for reasons related to substance use. The studies were conducted in a variety of CJ settings and collected information across 11 pre-selected domains: demographic characteristics, CJ involvement, HIV risk behaviors, HIV and/or Hepatitis C infections, laboratory measures of CD4 T-cell count (CD4) and HIV RNA viral load (VL), mental illness, health related quality of life (QoL), socioeconomic status, health care access, substance use, and social support. Results The STTR CJ cohort includes data on 11,070 individuals with and without HIV infection who range in age from 18 to 77 years, with a median age at baseline of 37 years. The cohort reflects racial, ethnic and gender distributions in the U.S. CJ system, and 64% of participants are African-American, 12% are Hispanic and 83% are men. Cohort members reported a wide range of HIV risk behaviors including history of injection drug use and, among those who reported on pre-incarceration sexual behaviors, the prevalence of unprotected sexual intercourse ranged across studies from 4% to 79%. Across all studies, 53% percent of the STTR CJ cohort reported recent polysubstance use. Conclusions The STTR CJ cohort is comprised of participants from a wide range of CJ settings including jail, prison, and community supervision who report considerable diversity in their characteristics and behavioral practices. We have developed harmonized measures, where feasible, to improve the integration of these studies together to answer questions that cannot otherwise be addressed.
Date of publication
Identifier
  • doi:10.1186/s13011-017-0107-4
Resource type
  • Article
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Rights holder
  • The Author(s).
Language
  • English
Bibliographic citation
  • Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy. 2017 May 16;12(1):24
Publisher
  • BioMed Central
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