Enhanced chemosensitivity to CPT-11 with proteasome inhibitor PS-341: Implications for systemic nuclear factor-κB inhibition Public Deposited

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Creator
  • Abendroth, Karin
    • Affiliation: N.C. Cancer Hospital, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine
  • Houston, Michael A.
    • Affiliation: N.C. Cancer Hospital, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine
  • Adams, Julian
    • Other Affiliation: Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
  • Baldwin, Albert
    • ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1246-1350
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Biology, N.C. Cancer Hospital, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology
  • Cusack, James C., Jr.
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114
  • Elliott, Peter J.
    • Other Affiliation: Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
  • Liu, Rong
    • Affiliation: N.C. Cancer Hospital, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine
Abstract
  • Inducible activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibits the apoptotic response to chemotherapy and irradiation. Activation of NF-kappaB via phosphorylation of an inhibitor protein IkappaB leads to degradation of IkappaB through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. We hypothesized that inactivation of proteasome function will inhibit inducible NF-kappaB activation, thereby increasing levels of apoptosis in response to chemotherapy and enhancing antitumor effects. To assess the effects of proteasome inhibition on chemotherapy response, human colorectal cancer cells were pretreated with the dipeptide boronic acid analogue PS-341 (1 microM) prior to exposure to SN-38, the active metabolite of the topoisomerase I inhibitor, CPT-11. Inducible activation of NF-kappaB and growth response were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Effects on p53, p21, p27 and apoptosis were determined. Pretreatment with PS-341 inhibited activation of NF-kappaB induced by SN-38 and resulted in a significantly higher level of growth inhibition (64-75%) compared with treatment with PS-341 alone (20-30%) or SN-38 alone (24-47%; P less than 0.002). Combination therapy resulted in a 94% decrease in tumor size compared with the control group and significantly improved tumoricidal response to treatment compared with all treatment groups (P = 0.02). The level of apoptosis was 80-90% in the treatment group that received combination treatment compared with treatment with single agent alone (10%). Proteasome inhibition blocks chemotherapy-induced NF-kappaB activation, leading to a dramatic augmentation of chemosensitivity and enhanced apoptosis. Combining proteasome inhibition with chemotherapy has significant potential to overcome the high incidence of chemotherapy resistance. Clinical studies are currently in development to evaluate the role of proteasome inhibition as an important adjuvant to systemic chemotherapy.
Date of publication
Identifier
  • 2-s2.0-0035328584
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Resource type
  • Article
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Journal title
  • Cancer Research
Journal volume
  • 61
Journal issue
  • 9
Page start
  • 3535
Page end
  • 3540
Language
  • English
Version
  • Postprint
ISSN
  • 1538-7445
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