The impact of early educational child care and the affective quality of the home environment on early adolescent mental health Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 22, 2019
Creator
  • McLaughlin, Andrea E.
    • Affiliation: School of Education
Abstract
  • The nature in which an early educational intervention, the affective quality of the early childhood home, and the early adolescent home environment influence mental health outcomes in early adolescence was examined using an experimental, longitudinal design. All participants were enrolled as infants in a randomized trial of early educational intervention. The study sample consists predominately of African-American individuals born into low-income, high-risk families. Within the present study treatment groups were not found to differ significantly from one another on overall levels of internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Post-Hoc analyses revealed that a significantly greater number of individuals in the control group experienced symptoms of externalizing psychiatric disorders falling in the borderline and clinically significant range. Treatment was not found to significantly moderate the influence of the early home environment on early adolescent mental health outcomes, nor was the early home environment found to significantly moderate the impact of the early adolescent home on early adolescent mental health outcomes. Previous research and theoretical evidence suggest that high-quality early educational child care programs may benefit children’s socioemotional outcomes. However, few early educational programs have examined direct indicators of mental health (i.e., internalizing, externalizing symptoms). Additional research is needed to determine whether early educational child care programs are associated with mental health benefits that persist into early adolescence.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Pungello, Elizabeth Puhn
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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  • Open access
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