THE ROLE OF SLEEP IN LINKS BETWEEN SOCIAL THREAT AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN ADOLESCENCE Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 20, 2019
Creator
  • Grimes, Melissa
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
Abstract
  • Experiences of social threat in adolescence are common. During adulthood, such experiences are associated with both sleep problems and cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity and hypertension. Less is known about these associations during adolescence. The current study (N=152) tested whether social threat predicts cardiovascular risk during adolescence, and whether these linkages are mediated by sleep problems. Social threat was assessed via measures of peer victimization/bullying and loneliness. Sleep problems were assessed via sleep duration and disturbance. Cardiovascular risk was assessed via BMI and systolic blood pressure. Experiencing increased social threat at age 15 predicted pre-/hypertension by age 16. Additionally, cumulative sleep problems predicted higher BMI. No social threat→sleep problems→cardiovascular risk meditational pathway emerged. The findings support select linkages among social threat, sleep problems, and cardiovascular risk in mid-adolescence. Further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms by which earlier social threat is translated into later cardiovascular risk.
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Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Shanahan, Lilly
  • Cox, Martha
  • Ornstein, Peter
  • Propper, Cathi
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2017
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