Developed Status and Gender Effects on Computerized ToEFL Acceptance Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Karakaya Ozyer, Kubra
    • Affiliation: School of Education
Abstract
  • The primary purpose of this study was to address gender and country developed status differences in computerized ToEFL acceptance. Based on previous studies, this study developed and tested a model, which included four latent variables: (1) perceived playfulness; (2) perceived usefulness; (3) perceived ease of use, and (4) behavioral intention to use. The study sample consisted of 237 international students, ranging in age from 18 to 44 years. Multigroup Structural Equation Modeling and Multiple Indicator Multiple Cause methods were used to test differences between subgroups for computerized ToEFL acceptance. This study did not find evidence of gender differences on computerized ToEFL acceptance. Moreover, participants' native country's developed status did not have an impact on the behavioral intention to use computerized ToEFL exam for international students. The implications for future research were discussed.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Cizek, Gregory J.
  • Greene, Jeffrey
  • Ware, William
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2014
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Place of publication
  • Chapel Hill, NC
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