MAFIA MOTIFS IN ANDREA CAMILLERI'S DETECTIVE MONTALBANO NOVELS: FROM THE CULTURE AND BREAKDOWN OF OMERTÀ TO MAFIA AS A SCAPEGOAT FOR THE FAILURE OF STATE Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Cerami, Adriana
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Romance Studies
Abstract
  • Twenty out of twenty-six of Andrea Camilleri's detective Montalbano novels feature three motifs related to the mafia. First, although the mafia is not necessarily the main subject of the narratives, mafioso behavior and communication are present in all novels through both mafia and non-mafia-affiliated characters and dialogue. Second, within the narratives there is a distinction between the old and the new generations of the mafia, and a preference for the old mafia ways. Last, the mafia is illustrated as the usual suspect in everyday crime, consequentially diverting attention and accountability away from government authorities. Few critics have focused on Camilleri's representations of the mafia and their literary significance in mafia and detective fiction. The purpose of the present study is to cast light on these three motifs through a close reading and analysis of the detective Montalbano novels, lending a new twist to the genre of detective fiction.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Dainotto, Roberto
  • Luisetti, Federico
  • Cervigni, Dino S.
  • Rao, Ennio
  • Chambless, Amy
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2015
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  • Chapel Hill, NC
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