THE TRANSACTIONAL EFFECTS BETWEEN FAMILY OCCUPATIONS AND CHILD EMOTION REGULATION ACROSS EARLY CHILDHOOD Public Deposited

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  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Lin, Mei-Ling
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Allied Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
Abstract
  • My dissertation is structured in the following way: Introduction, Manuscript 1 through 3, and conclusion. The overarching goal of this secondary data analysis project is to explore the transactional relationships between family occupations and young children’s emotion regulation. Data from the longitudinal Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project (EHSREP), collected at children’s approximate ages of 14, 24, 36, and 60 months, was utilized. Three specific aims were included to: (1) identify the zero-to-three transactional effects of parent supportiveness and child emotion regulation to child cognitive school readiness; (2) empirically validate family occupation constructs when children were approximately 14-, 24-, and 36-months old; and (3) demonstrate the potential contributions quantitative, longitudinal methods can make to occupational science and occupational therapy research. Each aim is associated with an individual study and will result in a publication-ready manuscript (Manuscript 1 through 3). Major findings from this project include: (1) During child ages 14 to 36 months, parental emotion and learning supports have a moderate tendency to remain stable; in addition, children’s emotion regulation abilities at later time points were significantly predicted by both children’s emotion regulation and parent supportiveness at earlier time points. Children’s cognitive school readiness was predicted by the autoregressive and the transactional effects between these two developmental processes. (2) Family occupation represents a unitary, but multi-faceted construct; the correlates of a family occupation construct, including family routines, participation opportunities for family activities, parent-child interaction quality, learning resources, and physical surroundings, were confirmed to be significant and stable throughout the 14-, 24-, and 36-month birthday-related assessment time points. The completion of this study expands our current knowledge on occupations through validating the measurable domains of family occupations. In addition, this study moves beyond current unidirectional and empirical understandings of children’s early psychosocial development towards more holistic and integrated perspectives. Equally important, this study yields empirical evidence that developmentalists, child psychologists, and pediatric occupational therapists will be able to use in their practices with children and families, such as the timing of intervention, EHS program focus, as well as therapeutic focus.
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Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Hooper, Stephen
  • Humphry, Ruth
  • Bagatell, Nancy
  • Iruka, Iheoma
  • Boyd, Brian
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2018
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