THE CHALLENGE OF COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENT ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: THE GO FOR GROWTH! INTERVENTION Public Deposited

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  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Wright, Jonathan
    • Affiliation: School of Education, School Psychology Graduate Program
Abstract
  • The community college student population has been found to be less academically prepared than their four-year counterparts. This relatively at-risk group is argued to struggle with academic motivation in the college setting. Researchers studying student implicit theories of intelligence have found that students who struggle in academia may do so because of maladaptive beliefs about the nature of their own intelligence. Students who struggle tend to believe their intelligence is stable (i.e. have a “fixed” mindset) whereas students who see their intelligence as malleable (i.e. have a “growth” mindset) have been found to have more adaptive behaviors that are more conducive to learning. Students’ goals in the academic context are important, as students with “mastery” orientations (who set goals for learning) had greater persistence and success than students with “performance” orientations (who set goals for showing learning or not showing a lack of learning). The present study was designed to assess whether an intervention targeting community college students’ implicit theories of intelligence was effective in a large southeastern community college at increasing students’ academic success, level of growth mindset, and level of mastery goal orientation. Results following implementation of the Go for Growth! intervention suggested that instructors found the intervention easy and worthwhile to implement and found some indications that students receiving the intervention have greater academic success in the course containing intervention, although the theory suggesting that this occurs through improving levels of growth mindset and mastery orientation was not supported. It was also noted that instructors had a significant influence on their student’s grades, which might indicate that the intervention may also have impacted the perceptions of the instructors regarding student grades.
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Advisor
  • Knotek, Steven
  • Tabori, Alex
  • Meece, Judith L.
  • Evarrs, Sandra
  • Simeonsson, Rune
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2018
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