THREE ESSAYS ON POPULATION, HEALTH, AND ENVIRONMENT LINKAGES: EVIDENCE FROM SOUTH AMERICA, SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA, AND SOUTHEAST ASIA Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Sellers, Samuel
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Curriculum in Environment and Ecology
Abstract
  • This dissertation examines relationships between family planning use, fertility, and environmental change in three developing country settings: Ecuador, Kenya/Uganda, and Indonesia. The goal of this dissertation is to examine the extent to which family planning and fertility influence and are also influenced by environmental factors. The first essay examines family planning on deforestation in Ecuador, using panel survey data from 1990 and 1999. The second essay examines a population, health, and environment project in Kenya and Uganda, with a focus on explaining the mechanisms through which the project may create synergistic effects that improve both health and conservation outcomes. The third essay uses longitudinal survey data collected in Indonesia between 1993 and 2015 to explore the effects of climate shocks on fertility preferences, family planning use, and births. Although the contexts for these essays differ, they are linked by important similarities, namely, patterns of environmental change and growing resource scarcity, susceptibility to the effects of climate change, and changing patterns of fertility. Broadly, these essays provide evidence supporting linkages between environmental change and fertility and may serve to inform the development of integrated development programs and policies that link reproductive health with conservation.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Bilsborrow, Richard E.
  • Angeles, Gustavo
  • Gray, Clark
  • Jagger, Pamela
  • Dickinson, Elizabeth
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2017
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