EXILE’S SHIFTING NARRATIVE: DISASSOCIATION, CO-HABITATION, AND INTRUSION IN FRENCH LITERATURE’S CORPOREAL SPACES Public Deposited

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  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Ritter, Angela
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Romance Studies
Abstract
  • Migration has touched French-speaking countries and has inspired a large body of literature recounting migrant experiences in the francophone world. Much of the scholarship on this literature has focused on questions of exile and foreignness in relation to geographical border-crossing as well as on France’s policies toward immigrants in relation to philosophies of hospitality. Yet, authors are also thinking about “home” in ways that transcend geopolitical borders. My dissertation, “Exile’s Shifting Narrative: Disassociation, Co-habitation, and Intrusion in French Literature’s Corporeal Spaces,” examines a set of creative works that displace and theorize the politics of exile and of welcome in terms of the borders of the human body. Considering contemporary French and francophone literature, performance, and film by authors Claire Denis, Wajdi Mouawad, Jean-Luc Nancy, and Marie NDiaye whose works are linked through their staging of dispossessed bodies, my dissertation offers a reconsideration of what it means to have or own a body, demonstrates the blurred boundaries between the Self and the Other, and reveals the possibility of being exiled from one’s own body or to someone else’s body. Furthermore, I present the body in these works as a space that can be entered and serve as a place of encounter, which thus also renders it a potential space for reconciliation, which leads me to argue that culture, past events, and memories—traumatic or not—may be shared between Selves and bodies, as part of a radical, embodied hospitality, and that he healing that needs to occur when reconciling trauma cannot happen in isolation.
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Advisor
  • Nzongola-Ntalaja, Georges
  • Tanner, Jessica
  • Reid, Donald
  • Moudileno, Lydie
  • Fisher, Dominique D.
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Graduation year
  • 2018
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