High school reform: a case study using the Breaking Ranks II framework Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Spencer, Julie D.
    • Affiliation: School of Education
Abstract
  • The purpose of this case study is to unpack the complex process of high school reform in six different high schools in the Seaboro School District. Seaboro School District, like others across the United States, is facing the many challenges that are surfacing in high schools. In the study, the researcher examined how a school district implemented the thirty-one strategic recommendations for high school reform identified in Breaking Ranks II. Specifically, the case study was aimed at discerning if: (1) a recommendation perceived as being more important than others by stakeholders was related to the depth and breadth of the implementation of the recommendation; (2) those recommendations perceived as having a higher degree of importance resulted in a more successful longitudinal implementation after three years of implementing the district reform plan; and (3) those recommendations perceived as having a higher degree of implementation resulted in a more successful longitudinal implementation after three years. The data revealed that the Breaking Ranks II recommendations were perceived as being important by the stakeholders at the beginning of the reform effort, as well as after three years. Additionally, the Seaboro School District increased the level of implementation from 2004 to 2007. However, there was not a relationship between the degree of importance of the recommendations and the longitudinal implementation (as measured by the difference in current practice from 2004 to 2007). Moreover, there was a slight relationship between the degree of current practice of the recommendations in 2004 and the longitudinal implementation (as measured by the difference in current practice from 2004 to 2007). Those recommendations that had a lesser degree of implementation in 2004 saw the greatest gains after three years while the recommendations that had a greater degree of implementation in 2004 saw smaller gains in practice after three years. Chapter Five presents implications and recommendations for school districts that are interested in doing a reform effort similar to the one that Seaboro initiated.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • English, Fenwick
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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