The impact of non-nutritive sucking habits of the risk for sleep disordered breathing in children Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Last Modified
  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Al-Talib, Tanya
    • Affiliation: School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics
Abstract
  • Objective: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is prevalent in children and commonly managed with tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between non-nutritive sucking (NNS) habits and the risk of SDB in children. Materials and methods: A convenience sample of 84 children 4-12 years of age was recruited for this study. Subjects were categorized as high risk and low risk for SDB based on the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ). The presence or absence of NNS was determined using a customized habit questionnaire. Results: Relative to NNS, there was no statistically significant difference between children in the low risk and high risk groups for SDB (p=0.2), while the risk for SDB between breast fed (BF) and bottle fed children was significantly different (p<0.001). Conclusion: NNS did not reduce the risk for SDB in the study groups, but breastfeeding dramatically reduced the risk.
Date of publication
Keyword
Subject
DOI
Identifier
Resource type
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Phillips, Ceib
  • Koroluk, Lorne
  • Vann, William
Degree
  • Master of Science
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2015
Language
Publisher
Place of publication
  • Chapel Hill, NC
Access
  • There are no restrictions to this item.
Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items