ROAD TO SERF-DURHAM: EXAMINING THE DECLINE OF THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN ENTREPRENEURSHIP ECOSYSTEM IN THE UNITED STATES (PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE) Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • McKoy, Henry
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of City and Regional Planning
Abstract
  • Business ecosystems are gaining in attention in contemporary scholarship. Historically, research has focused on how firms compete against other firms, how industries compete against other industries, or how markets compete against other markets (Moore, 1993; Mason & Brown, 2014). Attention is now turning to how business ecosystems compete against other business ecosystems. This dissertation introduces the concept of community economic ecosystem to the body of business and entrepreneurship ecosystem literature as a central component of understanding economic development, and applies it to study race as a contextual variable within entrepreneurial ecosystems and their outcomes. The first paper asks whether minority entrepreneurs have achieved parity with their shares of the national population in terms of business formation, growth and expansion. The findings suggest that America’s various business ecosystems seem to have moved from de jure segregation to de facto segregation, as opposed to fuller integration. While the overall diversity of the business ecosystem is changing rapidly, the business success ecosystem might not be diversifying as fast, if at all. The second paper asks what impact would the location of black entrepreneurs in minority entrepreneurial hubs, such as Atlanta, Georgia and Durham, North Carolina have on the relative economic equity of those populations compared to other racial groups in the area. The findings suggest that even in communities with relatively sizable black populations, high levels of black formal human capital, black experiential human capital, black wealth, black entrepreneurial spirit, and black political leadership, the economic outcomes for the black community still lag behind other communities. The final paper asks whether entrepreneurship provides a viable means for advancing mutually beneficial economic outcomes for black Americans – individually and collectively; and whether it ever has. A reinterpretation of Durham’s historic Hayti community, from the end of the Civil War to the end of the Civil Rights Era, illustrates that this racial enclave was able to utilize strategic upbuilding to construct a “group economy” effective at combating overt discrimination, relying on the institutional anchoring of their community via financial, educational, cultural, and political institutions, among others.
Date of publication
Keyword
DOI
Resource type
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Quercia, Roberto
  • Tewari, Meenu
  • Johnson, James
  • Rowe, William
  • Lowe, Nichola
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2018
Language
Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items