Excavating Imperial Fantasies: The German Oriental Society, 1898-1914 Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Twardowski, Kristen
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of History
Abstract
  • Though established near the end of the age of exploration and empire, after its formation in 1898, the Deutsche Orient-Gesellschaft (the German Oriental Society or DOG) quickly became a leading international archaeological society. This thesis explores this period of growth during the DOG's founding years in the 1890s until the First World War. It examines the motives that led to the DOG's inception, the structure and composition of this organization, and the ways in which the DOG used its publications to present itself to the public. Though members of the society held diverse professions, religions, and perspectives, they shared two aims: to extend Germany's international influence using archaeology and to solidify a respected place within the male elite of the German Empire. Unlike the rich literature on French and British Orientalism, studies on German Orientalism have only recently emerged. This thesis hopes to contribute to this developing scholarship.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Hagemann, Karen
  • Jarausch, Konrad Hugo
  • Sherman, Daniel
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2015
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Location
  • Europe
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Place of publication
  • Chapel Hill, NC
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