Social orienting as a construct underlying joint attention and imitation skills deficits in preschool children with autism Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Reavis, Shaye Benton
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
Abstract
  • This study examines the relationship between joint attention and imitation skills in preschoolers with autism by looking at a component skill within imitative behaviors: imitation of body movements, and its correlation with joint attention abilities. Based on a proposed model of social orienting, this study hypothesizes that imitation of body movements will be related to joint attention because both skill deficits require a child to focus attention towards another person. The deficit skill of children with autism to attend to another person is hypothesized to be at the core of social difficulties seen in these children, and therefore to account for deficits in both joint attention and imitation of body movements. If a relationship between joint attention and imitation of body movements is found, it will contribute to our understanding of social orienting as a construct underlying developmental processes in autism.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Mesibov, Gary B.
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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  • Open access
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