The role of nonmarital coparents and supportive non-parental adults in the psychosocial adjustment of African American youth from single mother families: a mixed methods study Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Sterrett, Emma M.
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
Abstract
  • The current study utilized a mixed methods research design (quantitative data: n = 185; qualitative data n = 20) to examine the quality of relationships African American youth from single mother families have with nonmarital coparents (i.e., adults identified as significantly involved in child-rearing), as well as social support they receive from additional non-parental adults. When not controlling for the full set of predictor variables, higher levels of youth-coparent relationship quality were associated with higher levels of youth self-esteem, and higher levels of coparent monitoring were associated with lower levels of youth externalizing symptoms. In addition, when all the predictors were taken into account, higher levels of youth-coparent relationship quality were associated with lower levels of youth internalizing problems and higher levels of coparent monitoring were associated with higher levels of youth internalizing problems. In addition, several types of SNPA support were associated with the likelihood of alcohol use, and some interactions involving total SNPA support also emerged. In contrast, neither coparent residence nor contact frequency were associated with outcomes. Implications of the results for future research on links between adults outside of biological parents and youth are discussed.
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  • In Copyright
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  • "... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Psychology (Clinical)."
Advisor
  • Jones, Deborah
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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Place of publication
  • Chapel Hill, NC
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  • Open access
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