SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AMONG WORKING-AGED AFRICAN AMERICANS Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Dennis, Alexis
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Sociology
Abstract
  • Researchers have consistently observed that high socioeconomic status (SES) is a fundamental cause of favorable mental and physical health outcomes among whites. Whether and how SES shapes the mental health of African Americans, however, remains unclear. Guided by a novel conceptual model, this study uses a sample of working-aged African Americans (n=776) from the Detroit Neighborhood Health Study to examine the relationship between several measures of SES with depression and anxiety, and the mechanisms that explain these relationships. Findings provide minimal support for SES as a strong predictor of mental health among African Americans in the Detroit context and suggest that other mechanisms, such as stressful or traumatic events, may be more important predictors of psychological distress among this sociodemographic group. This study adds to a growing body of literature indicating that structural factors considered to be fundamental causes of disease among whites may not operate similarly for racial-ethnic subpopulations.
Date of publication
Keyword
DOI
Resource type
Advisor
  • Hummer, Robert
  • Aiello, Allison
  • Mouw, Ted
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Graduation year
  • 2018
Language
Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items