THEY CAME TO TOIL: NEWS FRAMES OF WANTED AND UNWANTED MEXICANS IN THE GREAT DEPRESSION Public Deposited

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  • March 20, 2019
Creator
  • Garza, Melita Marie
    • Affiliation: Hussman School of Journalism and Media
Abstract
  • The onset of the Great Depression in 1929 coincided with pivotal events in US immigration history. These included the first law criminalizing entry into the United States without legal permission, renewed and vituperative national debates calling for the restriction of Mexican immigration, and, in a little-known historical episode, the instigation of Mexican repatriation programs, many sponsored by local US governments, that led to an exodus of about 500,000 Mexicans and Mexican Americans. This study comparatively analyzes news coverage of Mexicans, repatriation, deportation, and immigration in independently owned English- and Spanish-language newspapers in San Antonio, Texas, during the deepest recessionary period of the Great Depression, 1929 through 1933. By examining the similarities and differences in newspaper coverage in the state that experienced the most repatriations, this study illuminates how the media's symbolic annihilation of the Mexican and Mexican American experience during this period contributed to an episode of invisible civil rights history.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Friedman, Barbara
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Graduation year
  • 2012
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