QUANTIFYING COASTAL STREAM METABOLISM ACROSS A GRADIENT OF HUMAN WATERSHED DEVELOPMENT Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • White, Caitlin
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Marine Sciences
Abstract
  • Coastal headwater streams are important conduits and processors of terrestrially derived materials, however they remain understudied compared to upland streams. In particular, little is known about the impact of watershed development on coastal stream metabolism although there are likely important implications for management decisions. Whole-stream metabolism was measured seasonally between July 2013 and April 2014 using single-and two-station methods in four streams of the New River Estuary, North Carolina, which represented a gradient in watershed development. Streams were heterotrophic year-round and net daily metabolism ranged from -58.2 to -1.9 g O2 m-2 d-1. However, possible effects of watershed development including increased nitrogen concentrations, decreased dissolved organic carbon and chromophoric dissolved organic matter, and increased particulate organic carbon were correlated with decreased heterotrophy in impacted streams. These results provide a conceptual model of coastal streams in human dominated watersheds and will offer context for management at the scale of watershed decision-making.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Piehler, Michael
  • Ensign, Scott
  • Cable, Jaye
  • McKee, Brent
Degree
  • Master of Science
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2014
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Place of publication
  • Chapel Hill, NC
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  • This item is restricted from public view for 1 year after publication.
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