Nationalizing Fashion: Soviet Women's Fashion and the West, 1959-1967 Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Last Modified
  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Olmsted, Virginia
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of History
Abstract
  • After Joseph Stalin's death in 1953, the growth of the fashion industry allowed the Soviet Union to compete with the West in both consumer and cultural production. This thesis explores the development of Soviet women's fashion, beginning with the Dior Show in Moscow in 1959 and ending with the International Exhibition of Clothing in August 1967. During this period, Soviet designers endeavored to create clothing that was simple, practical, feminine, and elegant as a contrast to the perceived excesses of Western fashion design. Designers had difficulties developing clothing based on these parameters, often resorting to imitating Western fashion trends. By the late 1960s, designers began to utilize national motifs and textiles from the Soviet republics in their clothing, believing that national dress was inherently beautiful and practical. The focus on national motifs did far more than make clothing distinctly Russian, Uzbek, Latvian, or Ukrainian. It made clothing distinctly Soviet.
Date of publication
Keyword
Subject
DOI
Identifier
Resource type
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • McReynolds, Louise
  • Raleigh, Donald
  • Bryant, Chad
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2015
Language
Publisher
Place of publication
  • Chapel Hill, NC
Access
  • There are no restrictions to this item.
Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items