It's Still Not the Economy Stupid!: An Examination of Political Party Support for European Integration Public Deposited

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  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Smith, William
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Political Science
Abstract
  • Since the early 1990s, there has undoubtedly been an increase in euroskepticism, both among national political parties and among the general public. The literature has identified two general causes---concerns over national identity and utilitarian cost/benefit analyses. Originally, utilitarian concerns were thought to be the primary motivator, but research post-Maastricht introduced the idea that citizens' national identity may also be a driver. Recent research has concluded that, indeed, both are strong predictors of euroskepticism. But which offers more insight into the motivations behind euroskepticism? And in a broader sense, how does the issue of "Europe" relate to the more well-established cleavages along with political parties compete? Drawing on data from the 2010 Chapel Hill Expert Survey and utilizing OLS regression, I attempt to answer these questions. Overall, I find that national identity concerns---rather than socioeconomic concerns---are the more potent predictor of euroskeptic tendencies. But more importantly, I demonstrate that competition over European integration has been largely integrated into the broader cultural and economic cleavages that define domestic political competition.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Searing, Donald
  • Stephens, John
  • Hooghe, Liesbet
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2015
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  • Chapel Hill, NC
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