PARENT COMMUNICATION DURING SHARED READING WITH GIRLS WITH RETT SYNDROME: THE IMPACT OF PRINT REFERENCING Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Dennis, Allison
    • Affiliation: School of Education
Abstract
  • Shared reading is an engaging activity that can be used to facilitate communication between parents and their children. This is true for children with and without disabilities. The current study describes the communication that mothers used during shared reading with their daughters with Rett syndrome when reading unfamiliar books before and after the mothers learned to use a print referencing strategy (Justice & Ezell, 2004; Sim & Berthelsen, 2014). Three mother and daughter dyads were recorded six times each while engaging in their typical style of shared reading using unfamiliar electronic books. Then, mothers were taught a print referencing strategy, and their communication during shared reading was, again, recorded six times while reading unfamiliar, electronic books. The shared reading interactions were transcribed and analyzed for similarities and differences across conditions. The results suggest that teaching mothers of girls with Rett syndrome a print referencing strategy to use during shared reading significantly increases the use of print referencing. It was also determined that other forms of communication were not negatively affected by the introduction of the print referencing strategy. This study demonstrates that the well-researched strategy called print referencing can be added to shared reading with girls with Rett syndrome without negatively impacting parental communication.
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Advisor
  • Hatch, Penelope
  • Coleman, Mary Ruth
  • Erickson, Karen A.
  • Eaker-Rich, Deborah
  • Greer, Claire
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Graduation year
  • 2018
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