The Moderating Influence of Racial Identity Profiles on the Relationship Between Racial Discrimination and the Imposter Phenomenon Public Deposited

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  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Bernard, Donte
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
Abstract
  • This study used two waves of data to examine whether racial identity profiles moderate the association between subtle and blatant racial discrimination and changes in the imposter phenomenon (IP) among 157 African American college students attending a predominantly White institution. Utilizing latent profile analyses, four patterns of racial identity were identified: High Centrality/Multiculturalist, Moderate Black Centrality, Race-Focused, and Humanist. Both forms of racial discrimination significantly predicted increases in IP. Racial identity did not moderate the impact of subtle or blatant racial discrimination; however, students in the High Centrality/Multiculturalist and Moderate Black Centrality groups reported the highest and lowest levels of IP at Wave 2, respectively. Results suggest that IP may significantly differ as a function of the significance and meaning one places on being African American. I discuss how the findings lay the foundation for providing services to African American college students experiencing racial discrimination and feelings of intellectual incompetence.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Neblett, Enrique
  • Kurtz-Costes, Beth
  • Jones, Deborah
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2015
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Place of publication
  • Chapel Hill, NC
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