PERCEPTIONS OF STEREOTYPE VULNERABILITY, BELONGING AND CAMPUS CLIMATE BY AFRICAN AMERICANS ATTENDING A PREDOMINATELY WHITE INSTITUTION Public Deposited

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  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Thompson, Loren
    • Affiliation: School of Education, School Psychology Graduate Program
Abstract
  • The purpose of this study was to examine of stereotype vulnerability, sense of belonging and campus climate for African American college students at a Predominately White Institution (PWI) in the Southeast. This research used a sociocultural model to explore African American student perceptions at a PWI in the southeast of the United States. This study hypothesized that campus climate would moderate a relationship between stereotype vulnerability and sense of belonging. It was also hypothesized that gender (male, female) differences would exist concerning perceptions of these variables. An anonymous Qualtrics survey link, containing the three scales and demographic questions, was provided to students, through student led organizations (N=102). Pearson Product Moment Correlation statistic identified correlations between stereotype vulnerability and sense of belonging, sense of belonging and campus climate, as well as, stereotype vulnerability and campus climate. Further, a Multiple Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) found differences in the perception of stereotype vulnerability and sense of belonging among male and female students. A Hierarchical Regression Analysis did not reveal that the relationship between stereotype vulnerability and sense of belonging was moderated by campus climate. Both perceptions of environment (i.e., campus climate) and factors of social cognition (i.e., stereotype vulnerability) predicted the extent to which African American college students perceived they belonged in their university setting.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Simeonsson, Rune
  • Livingston, Jonathon
  • Evarrs, Sandra
  • Griffin, Dana
  • Knotek, Steven
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Graduation year
  • 2017
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