Controls on Fluvial Geomorphology in the Canadian Rocky Mountains Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Last Modified
  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Quinlan, Kevin
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Geological Sciences
Abstract
  • The Canadian Rocky Mountains record a dynamic history of erosion. Presently, bedrock rivers interact with the lithology and structural architecture of a large fold-and-thrust belt. Because the alpine landscape has been modified by Pleistocene and Holocene glaciation, rivers are also influenced by relict glacial landscape features. Here, we use topographic analysis and rock erodibility data to test the impact of lithology and glacial influence on fluvial form and incision potential in the headwaters of the Athabasca River Watershed. For 30 streams, we identify spikes in normalized channel steepness (ksn) where fluvial incision is focused. Results show that proximity to major lithologic contacts is not a predictor of knickzone location. Instead, bedrock channels are most perturbed from equilibrium where they flow over convexities at the intersection between hanging valleys and mainstem valley walls. These results suggest that glacial imprinting--mediated by variations in bedrock geology--controls Holocene erosion in this region.
Date of publication
Keyword
Subject
DOI
Identifier
Resource type
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Pavelsky, Tamlin
  • Stewart, Kevin
  • Willis, Michael
Degree
  • Master of Science
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2014
Language
Publisher
Place of publication
  • Chapel Hill, NC
Access
  • There are no restrictions to this item.
Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items