Fake forensics, real effects?: testing the cultivating power of crime drama Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 20, 2019
Creator
  • Ogilvie, Emily M.
    • Affiliation: Hussman School of Journalism and Media
Abstract
  • Central to cultivation theory is the premise that television's recurrent narrative, visual, and ideological patterns cultivate viewers' (mis)constructions of the real world in a manner positively correlated with the amount and types of exposure. This study tested that premise by examining the relationships between and among crime drama viewing, perceptions of the effectiveness of the U.S. criminal justice system, and scientific literacy via an analytical web-based survey of 1,365 undergraduate students. Contrary to the cultivation thesis, few significant and no strong associations emerged between or among any of the study's main variables; in other words, little evidence of cultivation effects or processes was manifest in the data.
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  • In Copyright
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  • "... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication."
Advisor
  • Gibson, Rhonda
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Place of publication
  • Chapel Hill, NC
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  • Open access
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