Does Genotype Moderate the Effects of Concussion History and Contact Exposure on Working Memory Processes in Retired Football Players? Public Deposited

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  • March 19, 2019
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  • Varangis, Eleanna
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
Abstract
  • Recent studies have linked concussions earlier in life and later memory problems, but little is known about neurocognitive long-term effects of concussion, and whether a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's Disease, Apolipoprotein-e4 (APOE-e4), might play a role in these long-term effects. In the present study, participants between 50-65 (N=63) were grouped based on concussion history (0-1 or 3+), football exposure (college or college+NFL), and APOE-e4 status (APOE-e4+ or APOE-e4-). Participants completed two batteries of neurocognitive tasks, and performed an fMRI-adapted N-back task. Neurocognitive results revealed selective deficits in memory across all sub-groups, but no differences between the groups. Functional connectivity results suggested that APOE-e4 genotype interacted with concussion and exposure history in accounting for differences in connectivity within a fronto-parietal working memory network. Thus, while there are no behavioral differences between groups, functional connectivity may be altered by the interaction between concussion history, football exposure, and APOE-e4 status.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Giovanello, Kelly
  • Guskiewicz, Kevin M.
  • Hopfinger, Joseph
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2015
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  • Chapel Hill, NC
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