Academic Race and Gender Stereotypes and Adolescents’ Self-Perceptions Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Skinner, Olivenne D.
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
Abstract
  • The relation between African American adolescents' academic self-concepts and their views about the abilities of their race and gender in-group and corresponding out-groups was examined in two academic domains: math/science and literacy. 296 seventh grade students reported their beliefs about the abilities of Blacks, Whites, girls and boys as well as their self-concept in these domains. Adolescents reported traditional academic race stereotypes, but reported that girls are better than boys in both math/science and literacy. Girls' math/science self-perceptions were related to their beliefs about the abilities of their racial out-group (i.e., Whites) and gender in-group (girls); literacy self-perceptions were related to their beliefs about the abilities of Blacks in that domain. Boys' math/science self-perceptions were related to their beliefs about the math/science abilities of Blacks and boys, but their literacy self-perceptions were unrelated to group competence perceptions. The implications for educational policy are discussed.
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  • In Copyright
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  • "... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in the Department of Psychology. (Developmental)."
Advisor
  • Kurtz-Costes, Beth
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Place of publication
  • Chapel Hill, NC
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  • Open access
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