THE DEVELOPMENT OF EYETRACKING AS AN OUTCOME MEASURE FOR SOCIAL INTERVENTIONS IN AUTISM Public Deposited

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  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Greene, Rachel
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
Abstract
  • This project aimed to evaluate a dynamic eyetracking task as a measure of treatment response for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) social skills interventions. Adolescent and young adult participants with ASD completed the eyetracking task, as well as questionnaires and neurocognitive measures of social functioning, before, immediately after, and two months after completing an empirically-validated ASD social skills treatment (SCIT-A). The study compared SCIT-A participants (n = 17) to participants with ASD who received treatment as usual (TAU; n = 22). Reliability of the eyetracking measure was assessed in typically developing controls (n = 22), and results indicated good test-retest reliability (α = 0.86, ICC=0.801). Correlation analyses found no significant relationships between the eyetracking task and measures of social functioning in all individuals with ASD at baseline. Although SCIT-A participants showed a significant increase in visual social attention from baseline to post-treatment, this trajectory was seen the TAU group as well. Findings indicate that the eyetracking task is measuring a unique construct not measured by the comparative social functioning assessments.
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Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Penn, David L.
  • Youngstrom, Eric
  • Dichter, Gabriel
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Graduation year
  • 2017
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