Autonomy, Competence, and Intrinsic Motivation in Science Education: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • October 10, 2018
Creator
  • Painter, Jason
    • Affiliation: School of Education
Abstract
  • The purpose of this study was to examine a proposed motivational model of science achievement based on self-determination theory. The study relied on U.S. eighth-grade science data from the 2007 Third International Mathematics and Science Study to examine a structural model that hypothesized how perceived autonomy support, perceived competence in science, intrinsic motivation, and science achievement related to each other. Mother's education and student gender were used as controls. Findings showed that the hypothesized model provided a good fit to the data. The strongest direct effect on science achievement was students' perceived competence in science. Student intrinsic motivation was shown to have a surprisingly negative effect on science achievement. Autonomy support had positive direct effects on students' perceived competence in science and intrinsic motivation and had indirect positive effects to science achievement. Results and implications for science education are discussed.
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  • In Copyright
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  • "... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the School of Education (Educational Psychology, Measurement, and Evaluation)."
Advisor
  • Meece, Judith L.
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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Place of publication
  • Chapel Hill, NC
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  • Open access
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