OUTCOMES AND CONSIDERATIONS FOR CHILDREN WHO ARE DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING: ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION FOR PRESCHOOL AND PRIMARY STUDENTS Public Deposited

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  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Page, Thomas
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Allied Health Sciences, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences
Abstract
  • The purpose of these studies was to provide a depiction of academic performance for students who are deaf and hard of hearing and the related services they receive. The first study utilized statewide, longitudinal data to examine standardized public school testing results in reading. Furthermore, it estimated how hearing loss, the use of testing accommodations, and school membership impacts performance. Comparted to students who were typically developing, students who are deaf or hard of hearing demonstrated statistically significant poorer performance on end of grade reading tests administered annually between grades 3 and 8. Students who were deaf or hard of hearing who utilized testing accommodations performed significantly worse than students who did not use accommodations. The achievement gap between students who are deaf or hard of hearing and typically developing students was observed at grade 3 and persisted until 8th grade, the final grade of administration. The second study focused on the preschool and school services received by students who are hard of hearing. In addition to a thorough account of the service characteristics and the professionals who provide them, this study analyzed differences in service setting, amount of family participation, and service provider confidence providing support to this unique population. A majority (81%) of preschool age CHH received services. Children were more likely to be in a preschool for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (CDHH) or exceptional children than a general education preschool. By elementary school, 70% received services, nearly all in general education settings. Sessions averaged twice a week for a total of approximately 90 minutes. Children who no longer received services performed significantly better on speech/language measures than those who received services, regardless of service setting. Professionals were primarily speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and teachers of CDHH. Speech-language pathologists reported significantly less comfort with skills involving auditory development and hearing technologies Through an examination of historical and current literature, the final component of this dissertation employed an historical account with current evidence to guide clinicians in the evaluation of children who are hard of hearing during the preschool and early elementary school years.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Ringwalt, Sharon
  • Hatch, Penelope
  • Oleson, Jacob
  • Crais, Elizabeth
  • Harrison, Melody
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2018
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