THE ADOLESCENT HEALTH BELIEF MODEL: CONCEPTALIZING COGNITIVE FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE MEDICATION NON-ADHERENCE AMONG ADOLESCENTS Public Deposited

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  • March 19, 2019
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  • Fenton, Nicole
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
Abstract
  • The medication non-adherence literature rarely employs theoretical models, and no models to date have been modified or created to understand adolescent medication non-adherence. The first aim of this study was to evaluate whether the six factors in the child health belief model (CHBM; susceptibility, severity, family support, benefits, barriers, self-efficacy) could be employed to understand adolescent medication non-adherence. The second aim was to propose a developmentally appropriate extension of the CHBM and provide an initial empirical evaluation of this model. This new more complete model is called the adolescent health belief model, and includes all factors of the CHBM as well as peer support and personal control. Participants were recruited from the UNC Chapel Hill Pediatric outpatient clinics and included 110 adolescents age 13-21 with a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease or chronic kidney disease. Results indicated that the CHBM as a whole was a significant predictor of medication non-adherence. Additionally, the factors of perceived benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy were each significant individual predictors of non-adherence above and beyond the other predictors in the model. The AHBM as a whole remained a significant predictor of non-adherence. The added factors of peer support and personal control, however, were not significant. Overall, results indicate that there is empirical evidence for the use of the CHBM. Further, it may be that concrete, proximal, cognitive factors such as benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy are of critical importance when trying to understand an adolescent's medication non-adherence.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Jones, Deborah
  • Gil, Karen M.
  • Algoe, Sara
  • Ferris, Maria
  • Baucom, Donald
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2014
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  • Chapel Hill, NC
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