OPPORTUNITY MATTERS: A MIXED-METHODS STUDY OF SOCIOECONOMIC STANDING, MASCULINITY, AND CONCURRENCY AMONG BLACK MEN Public Deposited

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  • March 20, 2019
Creator
  • Brown, Andre
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Health Behavior
Abstract
  • Background: Black men’s (BM) increased HIV risk is not fully explained by individual-level risk factors such as no condom use during sex. Their sexual networks--featuring high concentrations of concurrency--have been identified as social structural pathways to HIV disparities. Sociodemographics, like socioeconomic standing (SS) and sexual orientation, and masculinities have previously been identified as drivers of BM’s concurrency. Conscious of these factors, this dissertation used quantitative data from the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) (n=1709) to explore the direct and moderated relationship between BM's concurrency and their levels of respectability masculinity (SS and sexual orientation) and traditional masculinity ideologies. The dissertation also used qualitative (focus group) data from the Sexual Concurrency Media Study (N=3) to explore the influence of masculinities and personal values on BM’s relationship satisfaction, stress-coping behaviors, and concurrency; and the underlying cognitions and affective experiences shaping BM’s concurrency. Methods: An SS-index was created using financial-based measures in the NSFG. Exploratory Factor Analysis was used to derive a measure reflecting men’s level of traditional masculinity ideologies. Multiple logistic regression was used to model men’s odds of concurrency. Directed content analysis was used to analyze focus group transcripts. Results: Direct effects analyses revealed that greater odds of concurrency was significantly associated with: lower SS; traditional gender conforming (TGC) orientation; and higher endorsement of heteronormative traditional masculinity ideologies. Moderated effects analyses revealed: SS moderated the association between sexual orientation and concurrency resulting in greater odds of concurrency for TGC and traditional gender non-conforming (TGNC) BM and heteronormative traditional masculinity ideologies moderated the association between sexual orientation and concurrency resulting in greater odds of concurrency for TGC and TGNC BM. Qualitative analyses results revealed that relationship dissatisfaction; supportive community norms; sociodemographics; and cognitions, despite affective experiences all impact BM’s concurrency. Conclusions/Implications: BM’s concurrency and HIV risk are impacted by masculinities and socioeconomic factors, albeit in unexpected ways. Addressing these in future research and interventions might enhance existing efforts designed to reduce BM’s disproportionate HIV burden.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Powell, Wizdom
  • Adimora, Adaora
  • Doherty, Irene
  • Eng, Eugenia
  • Barrington, Clare
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2016
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