BENEFITS OF REDUCED PREMATURE MORTALITY FROM DECREASES IN PM2.5 AND OZONE IN THE UNITED STATES FROM 1999 TO 2015 Public Deposited

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  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Nawaz, Muhammad
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering
Abstract
  • Concentrations of PM2.5 and O3 have reduced dramatically in the United States (US) over recent decades from improved regulations and reduced emissions. Here annual mortality burdens and trends associated with PM2.5 and O3 in the US were assessed, comparing results for two datasets: a model simulation (NACR, 2009-2015) and a satellite-derived dataset (SAT, 1999-2011). During their respective time periods, annual PM2.5-related deaths reduced by 45,700 [29200, 58000] and 33,800 [22200, 37100] for SAT and NACR respectively, corresponding to 4.9% and 7.9% decreases per year. For O3 from NACR, annual deaths reduced by 500 [600, 2700], or 0.6% per year. Reduced concentrations of PM2.5 and O3, as opposed to changes in population and mortality rates, were the major cause of these reductions, preventing 29,400 (2011, SAT PM2.5), 32,500 (2015, NACR PM2.5) and 2,100 (2015, NACR O3) deaths relative to the case where concentration remained unchanged from the first year.
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Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • West, J.
  • Vizuete, William
  • Serre, Marc
Degree
  • Master of Science
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2018
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