Jerome's role in the transmission of the correspondence between Seneca and Paul Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Molina, Pablo Alberto
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Classics
Abstract
  • In this thesis I examine Jerome's role in the transmission of the correspondence between Seneca and Paul. Jerome was the first to mention the letters in De Viris Illustribus (DVI) in 393 C.E. The notice on Seneca in DVI greatly contributed to the survival and transmission of the moralist's correspondence. I argue that: (1) contrary to what many scholars have postulated, Jerome actually saw the forged correspondence in its entirety and was not fooled by it (which can be demonstrated by a detailed analysis of authorship issues in DVI). (2) Jerome found the forgery useful because it enabled him to co-opt Seneca as a pagan author capable of advancing his views on marriage in his treatise Adversus Iovinianum - written shortly after DVI - in which he copiously borrowed from Seneca's De Matrimonio.
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  • In Copyright
Note
  • "... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in the Department of Classics."
Advisor
  • Babcock, Robert
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Place of publication
  • Chapel Hill, NC
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  • Open access
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