Purchasing preferences and attitudes towards local food and farmers' markets: a case study of the Carrboro Farmers' Market credit, debit and EBT Truck Bucks marketing campaign Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • López, Sabrina Dora
    • Affiliation: Hussman School of Journalism and Media
Abstract
  • Markets have historically been places for the intersection of goods, agriculture, immigration patterns, and urban growth. Today, farmers' markets embody many different interests: curiosity about different kinds of foods, small-scale farming, sustainable agriculture, affordable and accessible food, and meeting places where communities build interpersonal relationships. The purpose of this master's thesis is three-fold: (1) to review literature on perceptions and purchasing behavior as they relate to local food and farmers' markets, (2) to provide an overview of the 2010 communications campaign marketing for the Credit, Debit and EBT program for the Carrboro Farmers' Market and (3) to provide a set of communications-based marketing recommendations and lessons-learned from the campaign. This Case Study of the 2010 Carrboro Farmers' Market Credit, Debit and Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT)/SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) Program examines literature on consumer motivations and interests of customers who purchase local or regional food, and will identify potential drivers behind purchasing behaviors of present and potential new customers for the Carrboro Farmers' Market. Communications and public relations recommendations are provided for future iterations of marketing efforts for the Credit, Debit and EBT program at the Carrboro Farmers' Market.
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  • In Copyright
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  • "... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication."
Advisor
  • Sinclair, Carol Janas
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  • Chapel Hill, NC
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  • Open access
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