Psychosocial profiles: serious and chronic female juvenile offenders with and without a substance use disorder Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Welch, Chiquitia L.
    • Affiliation: School of Social Work
Abstract
  • This dissertation examined the psychosocial profiles and prevalence of substance use and other mental health disorders in a sample of 203 incarcerated female juvenile offenders. The sample comprised all girls incarcerated in North Carolina over a 4 and one half year period. The psychosocial profiles of female juvenile offenders with and without a substance use disorder were compared, and latent profile analysis was conducted to determine if there were distinct psychosocial risk profiles in the state-based sample. Nearly 70 percent of the sample met criteria for an alcohol- or substance-related disorder. Conduct disorders were the most prevalent DSM-IV-TR diagnoses, followed by substance-related disorders and mood disorders. Serious female juvenile offenders with and without a substance use disorder differed in terms of their psychosocial risk profiles; female juvenile offenders with a substance use disorder had higher levels of problem severity. They were more likely to have problems related to alcohol use, drug use and cognition. Latent-class analysis revealed that there were four distinct groups (Aggression Only, Alcohol and Drug Use, Severe Alcohol and Drug Use, and Family Conflict) in the sample, with varying levels of problem severity related to family, peer, and school processes. Implications for adaptive and targeted interventions are discussed.
Date of publication
DOI
Resource type
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Roberts, Amelia C.
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Language
Access
  • Open access
Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items