Taking Linguistics: Does an Introductory Linguistics Class Result in Increased Social Emotional Competency? Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Rustad, Kate
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Linguistics
Abstract
  • The present study was conducted to investigate changes in dialectal tolerance and/or social emotional competencies of Linguistics 101 students through the duration of a semester. Students from Linguistics 101 were surveyed twice during Spring 2018, along with students from a control class outside of Linguistics. A third class based in variationist theory was also surveyed. Six speaker clips of various dialects (Valley Girl, AAE, NNS, and SAE) were played for participants in a verbal-guise task, to be rated on politeness, level of education, sociability, kindness, and professionalism. Participants were asked to rate themselves according to the five core competencies of social emotional learning: Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social Awareness, Relationship Skills, and Responsible Decision Making. Minor differences appeared in relation to social emotional competencies when comparing linguistics students to a control group. Dialect tolerance ratings showed minor differences, but not enough to suggest that an introductory linguistics course can change inherent biases.
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Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Terry, Jules
  • Mora-Marín, David
  • Cowell, Glynis
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2018
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