Three Studies Exploring Genetic and Social Influences on the Association Between Religiosity and Substance Use Behaviors Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 20, 2019
Creator
  • Freeman, Jason
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Sociology
Abstract
  • Research exploring the relationship between religiosity and substance use behaviors typically find a significant inverse association between those two phenomena. One implicit assumption of these studies is that the relationship between religiosity and substance use behaviors functions in a similar way for all individuals within a population. However, some research has shown that the association between religiosity and substance use behaviors may differ between certain sub-groups within a population. In this dissertation I explore three factors that may lead to variation in the association of religiosity and substance use. I explore variation across family status (i.e. marital and parental status); variation across the life course (between adolescence and early adulthood) and variation due to genetic factors. I find that 1) the association between religiosity and smoking is stronger among married parents compared to other groups; 2) the association between religiosity and alcohol use increases between adolescence and early adulthood; and 3) there is genetic component of the covariance of religiosity and substance use behaviors that increases between adolescence and early adulthood. My findings reveal the need for researchers exploring the association between religiosity and substance use to take into account potential variation in that relationship.
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Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Moffitt, Terrie
  • Guo, Guang
  • Shanahan, Michael
  • Bollen, Kenneth
  • Shanahan, Lilly
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2016
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